Blog Archives

No Pass – No Play – No Exceptions

Police-2

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

For all USSF sanctioned competitions that we work, we must make sure that the participants have a valid pass for the competition. In addition to being used to validate that the rosters and players match and are in order, the pass may be required as the “entry ticket” to enter the pitch in competitions with limited substitutions. In competitions with unlimited substitutions, the player still must have a valid pass at check-in (and for late arrivals, before they enter the pitch).

The passes for any one match must be the same for both teams and for all participants on each team. Some teams have passes from more than one registration authority (such as NJYS and US Club). In some cases the same two teams will play each other under one set of passes, and then play again another time under the other. We cannot allow mixed passes, even for coaches. Both teams and all participants play under one set or the other – never mixed.

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The Foul of Handling

(Photo credit: Newscom via everyjoe.com)

At the October meeting of the SRANJ, Alan Brown, NJ State Director of Assessment, provided a clinic on handling, or “hand balls”. He described the wording in Law 12 and then the guidance for how referees should apply it. He stated that referees must first determine whether handling has occurred, then, if it did, where it occurred (for the restart) and whether misconduct was involved. He used video clips to make the following points: Read the rest of this entry

New Referee Courses Announced

English: A Welcome To New Jersey sign promotin...

The NJ Referee Committee has announced the entry-level (Grade 8) class schedule for this Summer. Please pass on to anyone interested in becoming a referee (they must be sixteen years of age by the first day of the class). Students are now required to take online lessons and a test before the actual classroom sessions. It appears that the registration fee includes an OSI referee starter kit (perhaps to get some consistency in appearance for new referees). Registration information is here:

http://www.njrefs.com/BecomingaReferee/index_E.html

Recertification classes for existing referees have not yet been posted…

SIAPOA: USSF Guidelines on Serious Foul Play

Red Card!

Red Card! (Photo credit: Stéfan)

With the Nani send-off in the Man U-Real Madrid UEFA Champions League match on March 5, it may be a good time to review the criteria for judging Serious Foul Play. The following was originally published by US Soccer in its “Week in Review” series on May 6, 2010.


Red Card Challenges: Endangering the Safety of the Opponent and Excessive Force

Match officials must be constantly diligent in their effort to ensure player safety and deal with incidents of 100 percent misconduct. For example, referees must be able to successfully identify those situations that clearly meet all criteria for endangering the safety of the opponent and the use of excessive force (both components of red card challenges). To assist officials with deciphering red card tackles, U.S. Soccer has established the SIAPOA criteria:

  • Speed of play and the tackle
    The faster the tackler is moving, the greater the force and likelihood of endangering the safety of the opponent. Additionally, speed also equates to less control of the challenge and the less likely the attacker can cleanly win the ball.
  • Intent
    The intent of the tackler. Was the tackle intended to send a message or to cleanly win the ball?
  • Aggressive nature
    Did the tackler lunge for the ball with one or both feet? Consideration should be given to the distance between the attacker and the tackler at the time the tackler leaves his feet. The further the distance, the less control the tackler has of his actions and the less likely the tackler is to play the ball. Are cleats up and exposed to the opponent?
  • Position of the tackler
    In particular, his legs (height of the tackler’s leading leg and the follow-up action by the tackler’s trailing leg).
  • Opportunity to play the ball
    Was the ball within playing distance? Or, was the ball already past the tackler at the time the tackler’s feet came in contact with the opponent. Tackles from behind and from the side (outside of the peripheral vision of the attacker with the ball) increase the likelihood contact will need to be made with the attacker prior to playing the ball.
  • Atmosphere of the game
    Referees must consider the overall temperature of the match and the player in question. Has an aggressive attitude been displayed to that point? Is frustration amongst or between the players evident?

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Comparison of High School, College, and FIFA/USSF Rules/Laws

If you work high school and/or college as well as USSF, NISOA’s Rules Interpreter has published a great cross-reference of the differences in the various regulations. You can find the document here at the “In the Opinion of the Referee” blog.

https://www.intheopinionofthereferee.com/featured/comparative-study-of-the-ruleslaws-of-soccer/

The ITOOTR site is a great reference. I will be preparing a list of other helpful referee web sites shortly…