Blog Archives

The Foul of Handling

(Photo credit: Newscom via everyjoe.com)

At the October meeting of the SRANJ, Alan Brown, NJ State Director of Assessment, provided a clinic on handling, or “hand balls”. He described the wording in Law 12 and then the guidance for how referees should apply it. He stated that referees must first determine whether handling has occurred, then, if it did, where it occurred (for the restart) and whether misconduct was involved. He used video clips to make the following points: Read the rest of this entry

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IFAB 2013 AGM Decisions

Assistant referee during the match FC Barcelon...

Assistant referee during the match FC Barcelona-RCD Mallorca. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In relation to the Laws of the Game, IFAB approved a clarification of the wording of Law 11 (Offside, Interpretation of the Laws of the Game). The IFAB agreed that the current wording is not precise enough, regarding “interfering with an opponent/gaining an advantage.” The new approved wording can be found in the agenda on FIFA.com (see below).

Brief reports were also provided on Additional Assistant Referees, and the decision approved last year related to Law 4 (The Players’ Equipment) with regards to the headscarf – to allow a trial, non-mandatory period – the IFAB reiterated that a final decision will be made at next year’s Annual General Meeting.

Finally, a proposal to review Law 8 (The Start and Restart of Play “Dropped Ball”) was postponed for further consultation, with a new proposal to be presented at the 2014 Annual General Meeting. An agreement was also made to form a working group to review the full Laws of the Game to improve clarity where appropriate.

Amendments to the Laws of the Game taken today by the IFAB come into effect on 1 July 2013. Read the rest of this entry

IFAB Decision on Head Scarves

From US Soccer:

IFAB ANNUAL BUSINESS MEETING – DECISIONS AND DIRECTIVES

The International Football Association Board (IFAB) has completed its evaluation of how to implement its decision to allow headscarves to be worn under certain conditions.

As this is a temporary measure and subject to change based on reported experiences, it is not at this time being made part of the Laws of the Game, but FIFA has issued a directive with the following guidelines which are in effect immediately.

Law 4 – The Players’ Equipment

The headscarf must

  • be of the same color as the jersey
  • be in keeping with the professional appearance of the player’s equipment
  • not be attached to the jersey
  • not pose any danger to the player wearing it or any other player (e.g., opening/closing mechanism around neck)
  • only be worn by female players

U.S. Soccer’s Advice to Referees

  • The phrase “same color as the jersey” can be expanded to mean the same main color as the jersey
  • The inspection for safety of any headscarf should be focused on the objective of allowing the scarf to be worn unless it is clearly unsafe and cannot be made safe
  • This language confirms that male players cannot wear headscarves under any circumstances

Additional Assistant Referees

If you have aspirations to making it to the FIFA panel as a referee or assistant referee, or you have just been curious about the new Additional Assistant Referee (AAR) mechanics, please check out the video at this link:

http://www.uefa.com/uefa/footballfirst/matchorganisation/refereeing/news/newsid=1880799.html

Besides getting to hear Pierluigi Collina talk about refereeing, you can see how the AARs communicate with the referee. I was fascinated by the nature of the chatter on the radio. The video also notes that the AARs are actually staffed by members of the referee panel and the 4th official (previously always a referee) can be staffed by an assistant referee. This puts at least three referee-level officials on each match.